Field Notes: The Polar Field Services Newsletter

GrIT Details: SCAT SitRep 2 April

The Strategic Crevasse Avoidance Team (SCAT) stops a few miles out on the ice sheet to ensure the rig is towing well. Brad Johnson (traverse manager) and Erik Nichols (carpenter) have accompanied the SCAT for the first few miles to help with adjustments. The ramp is visible between the Case (left) and the outhouse at rear of traverse rig. All photos: Robin Davies

2 April 2010 20:00 Thule Local

Flagged to: B6

GPS Coordinates: N 76 26.568 W 66 6.110

Visibility: Unlimited

Sky: Clear

Wind: SW 5mph

Temp: Unreported but colder than April 1st

 

Comments:

All is going well. The team found crevasses near B5 today. There is now a slight route change which has moved B5 to the south.

The wannigan is quite warm and needs to be vented when the heater is on. Tomorrow they will move camp up to B6 and prospect further up the route. A weather forecast check shows our area to be clear through Wednesday with light winds. Thursday promises increasing clouds and wind speeds to 28k.

Email from Robin Davies, PFS equipment operator/mechanic:

“It went great yesterday; the tucker pulled the setup no problem at all. Once the surface smoothed out we were doing 6-7.5mph in second gear at 2,000 rpm. Haven’t found any problems with our camp set up yet and it’s a gloriously sunny day up here this morning.”

Robin writes, "It was such a perfect, still evening at our first camp, we just had to get the BBQ out. It was great!" Behind Kevin, the brown box is the camping wannigan, which houses kitchen facilities and supplies.

Email from Allan Delaney (radar expert):

“Internet on the Greenland ice sheet.

“All is well.  Cold at night.  Bright sunshine today with some wind.  A cold day for Kevin.  We’ve worked to B6 and returned to camp.  There are two substantial crevasses which parallel both the old route and the new diversion.  All well marked by Kevin after discovery by Jen with a zig-zag survey. No problem for passage.  Glad to hear that SCAT [the new name the GPR team has adopted] is a big hit.”

The distance traveled today: about 12 miles.—Alan Cornelison

The Greenland Inland Traverse is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). CH2M HILL Polar Services and Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratories are working together with the NSF to develop the traverse infrastructure and route. The 2010 spring traverse has several foci: find a safe overland route to Summit Station to help reduce logistical costs and environmental impacts of conducting research there; provide a research platform for scientists conducting field work in Greenland; optimize mobility by focusing on the sled/snow interface.  For more field notes coverage of GrIT, click here

GrIT contact:
Jay Burnside, Polar Field Services, CH2M HILL Polar Services Construction/Operations manager
Jay at polarfield.com