Field Notes: The Polar Field Services Newsletter

Greenland in The Atlantic: a stunning photo essay

A full moon, over an iceberg from the Jakobshavn Glacier, on July 23, 2013 near Ilulissat. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A full moon, over an iceberg from the Jakobshavn Glacier, on July 23, 2013 near Ilulissat. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A picture often is worth more than 1,000 words. Take the Atlantic’s recent photo essay, “Greenland: A Global Warming Laboratory.”

We were pleased to help with the photojournalist Joe Raedle’s (Getty Images) logistics while on the ice sheet, and we heartily support spreading the word of the research going on in Greenland.

We support many scientists and other researchers affiliated with the National Science Foundation and other organizations who study the impact of a changing climate on glaciers, sea levels, human, animal, and plant populations, and more.

As the Atlantic says in the essay’s intro:

“Rapid warming at the summit of the Greenland ice sheet has caused year after year of record melting at the surface, raising concern, even as recent research indicates the ice sheet has endured warmer periods. The warmer temperatures that have had an effect on the glaciers in Greenland also have altered the ways in which the local populace farm, fish, hunt and even travel across land.”

This is a stunning piece of journalism. Check it out. Click here to go directly to the website.

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